Cymatics

Cymatics:
physics the study of wave phenomena, esp sound, and their visual representations.” 

(http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/cymatics)

Very early audio-visualisation came from Cymatics which was first discovered by Hans Jenny. Cymatics are visual representations of sounds, whereby when sounds are passed through various different materials, the vibrations create a diverse range of visual patterns (as displayed in the Nigel Stanford video above). Liquid, particles, grains or pastes can be used to create these various effects, each with different outcomes. When varying viscosities of liquid are used, they can create almost ‘dancing’ figures:

gallery_tech-sony-speaker

Cymatics have been described as a way to “enable us to experience sound through vision” (Lewis, S. 2010), which is what has been a huge influence on my work; I have always been interested in the movement of natural forms, such as particles and liquid, and also the idea of bringing life to stationary objects, and to do this through the medium of sound is going to bring a new dimension to my work. Bringing life to objects was the idea behind my Ferrofluid project, as I was able to make a black liquid come to life with the use of magnets and sensors.
I also have a passion for music and audio, so the study of Cymatics and how objects move in reaction to audio is very interesting to me – which is where my idea of immersive music visualisation has come from. For my project, instead of having tangible objects like in the image and video above, I want to simulate these effects in After Effects to create the immersive experience.

References:
Lewis, S. (2010) SEEING SOUND: HANS JENNY AND THE CYMATIC ATLAS. University of Pittsburgh. Available at: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/7448/1/StephenLewisBPhil2010.pdf (Accessed: 2 December 2016).

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